Practical Budgeting Tips for People Moving to Larger Cities 

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Practical Budgeting Tips for People Moving to Larger Cities 

It’s easy to see why so many people flock to major metropolitan areas. In addition to having more career opportunities than less populous areas, many larger cities are cultural hubs that are brimming with activity. However, in spite of city life’s many advantages, densely-popular areas tend to have a higher cost of living than rural communities and small towns. As such, transplants from smaller areas are liable to experience a case of sticker shock upon arriving in popular urban locales. Anyone looking to get the most out of city life without breaking the bank can benefit from the following pointers. 

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Find Cost-Effective Storage for Larger Items 

When searching for your first big city apartment, you’re liable to find that the places in your price range don’t contain sufficient space to house all of your possessions. So, if you’re moving to the city with lots of shelving, cabinetry and furniture, you may need to seek out cost-effective outside storage solutions. When perusing your options, keep an eye out for storage facilities that offer reasonable rates, convenient accessibility and good security. Golden State residents searching for first-rate public storage Sacramento will find no shortage of attractive prospects.     

Limit How Often You Dine Out 

If you’ve spent most of your life in a small town, there’s a good chance your dining options were limited to chain restaurants and a handful of independently-owned standouts. That being the case, the abundance of unique eateries will probably be among the first things to hit you upon arriving in your new locale. When experiencing big city life for the first time, many transplants make a point of dining out and ordering in as often as possible. Although this is a great way to expand your palette, this approach to dining can quickly eat away at your finances. 

While there’s nothing wrong with wanting to indulge in culinary delights, doing so on a daily basis generally isn’t conducive to financial security. So, instead of dining out every day, limit restaurant excursions and ordering takeout to once or twice a week. This will give you plenty of opportunities to enjoy big city cuisine while keeping your finances intact. Additionally, placing limits on how often you dine out will make restaurant meals feel like more of a treat and consistently provide you with something to look forward to. 

Consider Getting Rid of Your Vehicle 

Depending on which big city you’ll be relocating to, a vehicle may be a needless expense. Parking and garage fees in large cities generally aren’t cheap, and driving through heavily congested streets may actually serve to add time to your journey. As such, in some instances, getting rid of your car stands to save you a considerable amount of money and hassle. This is particularly true when it comes to cities with robust public transit systems, like New York City. Conversely, if you’ll be moving to Los Angeles, which was essentially designed for cars, it’s probably best that you hang on to your vehicle. Furthermore, with the COVID-19 pandemic still in full effect, keeping your car and continuing to drive until a vaccine becomes widely available may help limit potential exposure to the virus.   

Find Ways to Entertain Yourself at Home 

Many young adults love big cities for their nightlife, and while hitting the town with friends can be a lot of fun, it can also prove financially draining. This isn’t to say you can never enjoy a night out, but in the interest of protecting your finances, wild nights should not be frequent indulgences. Instead, look for enjoyable ways to keep yourself entertained at home. Whether this entails tackling your video game backlog, binging new shows you’ve been meaning to get to or relaxing with a good book, staying in can be incredibly rejuvenating and far more fulfilling than you may think.

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Major metropolitan areas have a lot to offer. Ample fine dining options, first-rate shopping and an abundance of culture are just a few of the reasons many people prefer big city life to small town living. However, if there’s one fault to be found with relocating to a larger city, it would be the increased cost of living. Sleepy small towns may not have a lot going on, but they typically have more affordable rental rates and home prices than more populous areas. Of course, this isn’t to say that you should allow sticker shock to impede your big city dreams. Putting the previously discussed tips into practice can help financially-savvy transplants enjoy big city life without leaving a sizable dent in their finances.